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Heart Health

Atrial Fibrillation
print-icon A New, Healthier Way to Treat Atrial Fibrillation
The incidence of atrial fibrillation or AFib is generally considered to be reaching epidemic numbers, especially among people over age 60. Dr. Roger Fan explains how ablation, the front-line therapy for AFib, is being made safer for patients and medical personnel by a revolutionary new technique that doesn’t use any radiation.
print-icon Is the New, Smaller Pacemaker Right for You?
Many people have heart rhythm disorders, which means that instead of beating at a regular, predictable pace, the heart beats too fast, too slow or it stalls. These disorders are often caused by a problem in the heart’s electrical system. Slow heart rhythms may be treated with pacemakers to make the heart beat correctly. Now, for people with one type of rhythm disorder called “bradycardia,” Stony Brook University Heart Institute is using MicraTM, a revolutionary new type of pacemaker. Eric J. Rashba, MD, Director of the Heart Rhythm Center at Stony Brook Heart Institute, explains.
print-icon
Living Your Best Life with Atrial Fibrillation (AFib)
September is Atrial Fibrillation Awareness Month and Stony Brook heart rhythm specialist Roger Fan, MD, offers a variety of tools here to help you live your best life with AFib — the most common heart rhythm disorder. And, looking beyond September, Stony Brook’s compassionate and experienced AFib healthcare team is available year-round to help navigate through any uncertainty and answer any, and all, questions you may have.
print-icon Reducing Stroke Risk for People With Atrial Fibrillation
People with an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation (AFib) have a five-to-seven percent increased risk of having a stroke compared to people without AFib. To help prevent strokes, blood thinners such as direct oral anticoagulants or warfarin are prescribed. Most people do well, but some experience bleeding problems or have other reasons why blood thinners aren’t the best option. Dr. Eric Rashba, Director, Heart Rhythm Center at Stony Brook Heart Institute, explains how a device called WatchmanTM, which is implanted in the heart, can offer a lifelong solution for those dealing with this problem.
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What You Should Know About Atrial Fibrillation
Atrial fibrillation or AFib is a type of arrhythmia or irregular heartbeat – and it’s a common, serious but treatable cardiac condition. AFib affects more than 2.5 million people in the U.S. AFib makes it five to seven times more likely you’ll have a stroke than the general population. Clots caused by AFib can also travel to other parts of the body, and cause damage. Dr. Eric Rashba explains how AFib can be managed, as well as the latest treatment approaches.
Cardiac Catherization
print icon image You've Been Told You Need a Cardiac Cath Procedure. Now What?
Catheters — flexible, ultrathin tubes — have changed the way heart disease is diagnosed and treated. What once required large incisions and long recovery time can now be accomplished with tiny incisions, less pain and faster recovery. Here, Robert Pyo, MD, Director of the Stony Brook Cardiac Catheterization Laboratories at Stony Brook University Hospital and Stony Brook Southampton Hospital, answers your cardiac catheterization FAQs.
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) Support
print-icon Lifesaving Procedure for Sudden Heart and Lung Failure
When people are undergoing sudden, severe heart or lung failure, there is not enough oxygen in the body and the situation is life-threatening. With advanced technology called ECMO and the expertise of highly trained heart specialists, Stony Brook University Heart Institute has been giving new hope to people needing this urgent life support.
Heart Health/General Information
print-icon Be Your Own Best Advocate: Women and Heart Health
Despite its longtime reputation as mostly a man’s problem, heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the U.S. — responsible, in fact, for nearly one-third of deaths among women. That’s more than the next seven causes combined, including all cancers. The good news: Over 80 percent of heart disease is preventable. Stony Brook cardiologist, Michelle Weisfelner Bloom, MD, shares how.
print-icon How to Invest in Your Heart Health at Any Age
Every 40 seconds, an American will have a heart attack, nearly five million are living with heart failure and about five percent of the population has an arrhythmia. Yet as alarming as this may sound, the good news is that many issues leading up to heart disease are within our control. Here’s what Stony Brook Chief of Cardiology, Hal Skopicki, MD, PhD, has to say about investing in your heart health.
print-icon What You Should Know About Choosing a Cardiologist
Choosing a cardiologist is an important decision. After all, your heart – and your life – may depend on it. So how do you choose a doctor who’s right for you? For suggestions, we asked specialists with Stony Brook University Heart Institute, the region’s leading referral center for clinically complex care. Here’s what Southampton-based cardiologists Travis Bench, MD, and Dhaval Patel, MD, had to say.
print-icon Heart-Safe Snow Shoveling
It’s important to keep in mind that extreme winter activity such as shoveling snow — or even pushing a heavy snow blower — can cause an uptick in blood pressure and heart rate, putting stress on your heart and placing you at risk for a heart attack. Before tackling that foot-high mound of winter wonderland blanketing your driveway, take some time to read these heart-safe tips from cardiologist On Chen, MD.
Heart Failure
print-icon What You Should Know About Heart Failure and Cardiomyopathy
Stony Brook’s Heart Failure and Cardiomyopathy Center and Ventricular Assist Device Program — the only one on Long Island — have been widely recognized for excellent outcomes, state-of-the-art diagnosis and treatment, and innovative research efforts that are helping many patients — even those with advanced conditions — feel better and live longer.
print-icon How a Monitoring Device Helps Patients with Heart Failure
Patients with heart failure are faced with many life-challenging problems. With progression of symptoms, many patients require hospitalization. To help reduce the chance of hospitalizations, physicians at the Stony Brook University Heart Institute are using advanced monitoring technology, including the CardioMEMS™ Heart Failure Monitoring System to allow patients to gain control of their heart failure care. Hal Skopicki, MD, PhD, and Puja Parikh, MD, MPH, explain how the device works and how it helps improve quality of life.
Heart Valve Disease
print-icon Innovative Approach to Heart Valve Disease
A new chapter in the diagnosis and treatment of heart valve disease has opened at Stony Brook University Hospital. Dr. Smadar Kort talks about valve disease and what the Valve Center offers.

HIV and AIDS

print-icon What You Need to Know About AIDS Today
At Stony Brook we work every day of the year to raise awareness, promote testing, provide early intervention, offer the latest treatments, and serve as Suffolk County's premier resource for children, adults and women who are pregnant with HIV and AIDS.

Huntington's Disease

  Are Huntington's disease and chorea the same thing?
Huntington’s disease is a rare, genetic (inherited from a parent) disorder that affects the brain. It’s estimated that three to seven people out of 100,000 live with Huntington’s disease. And in its advanced stages, a person can die from complications from it. While there is no cure, there’s an increasing amount of research devoted to finding one. There are also treatments that can provide hope and help a person’s quality of life.

Low-Dose Imaging

print-icon What You Need to Know About Low-Dose Imaging
Most imaging studies involve the use of radiation ions in order to peer into the human body and make a diagnosis. However, radiation exposure carries potential risks. Now, thanks to changes in technology and techniques, lower dose procedures are available. Dr. Mark Schweitzer, Chairman of the Department of Radiology for Stony Brook Medicine, talks about what this means and how it works.

Kidney Transplant

print-icon What You Should Know About Stony Brook's Kidney Transplantation Program
Wayne C. Waltzer, MD, Director, Kidney Transplantation Services and Professor and Chair, Department of Urology, who has been part of the program from the beginning, discusses the program.

Laryngology

print-icon Listen to What Your Voice Is Telling You
Your voice is invaluable — to basic communication, to your occupation, to self-expression, to your identity. You can help keep this vital gift in good health by treating your voice kindly and staying alert to changes that may signal a problem. Here are suggestions from voice specialists Melissa M. Mortensen, MD, Elliot Regenbogen, MD, and Marilyn D. Baricevac, MS, CCC-SLP.

Mechanical Thrombectomy

print-icon What You Should Know About Treatments for Ischemic Stroke
Iscemic strokes are the most common type of stroke, occurring in about 80 percent of cases. A major new recommendation from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association is for selected acute ischemic stroke patients to receive mechanical thrombectomy, a procedure to remove clots that block large vessels, as the standard of care.

Melanoma

print-icon It's Good for Your Health to Know about the Dark Side of the Sun
Skin cancer — including melanoma and basal and squamous cell carcinomas — is the most common of all cancer types. The rates of melanoma have been rising for the last 30 years. Tara L. Huston, MD, assistant professor of surgery and dermatology, and leader of Stony Brook's Melanoma Management Team, explains what can be done to help prevent skin cancer and how to detect its early signs.

Men's Health

print-icon The Future Is Here: New Guidelines, Diagnostics and Approaches to Prostate Cancer
June is Men’s Health Awareness Month, which is the ideal time to get the word about the dramatic changes in the way prostate cancer is diagnosed and treated. Stony Brook urologist Dr. Wayne Waltzer explains these major medical advances and what they mean for you.

Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery

print-icon Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery: Less Pain, Faster Recovery
Today, many routine as well as complex obstetric and gynecologic (OB/GYN) surgeries can be performed using minimally invasive techniques. OB/GYN surgical specialists Todd Griffin, MD, and William Burke, MD, describe some of the latest innovative surgical treatment options available at Stony Brook Medicine for both benign and cancerous conditions.

Movement Disorders

print-icon Are Huntington's disease and chorea the same thing?
Huntington’s disease is a rare, genetic (inherited from a parent) disorder that affects the brain. It’s estimated that three to seven people out of 100,000 live with Huntington’s disease. And in its advanced stages, a person can die from complications from it. While there is no cure, there’s an increasing amount of research devoted to finding one. There are also treatments that can provide hope and help a person’s quality of life.
print-icon Why do my hands shake?
Movement disorders can be debilitating and significantly impact one’s quality of life. An accurate diagnosis and treatment by a neurologist who specializes in these often challenging and complex disorders is key.
  What You Should Know About Movement Disorders
Movement disorders are a group of chronic neurological disorders that can be debilitating. Dr. Hanna Czarkowska and Dr. Chuck Mikell are specialists skilled and knowledgeable in assessing and treating complex movement disorders.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

print-icon Devic's Disease: It Acts Like MS, But it's Not
Dr. Patricia Coyle is the founding director of the Stony Brook Multiple Sclerosis Comprehensive Care Center. She is an expert in neuroimmunology, which is the diagnosing and treatment of neurological disorders caused by inflammation or autoimmune conditions in the nervous system.
print-icon Multiple Sclerosis: Who’s at Risk and How Is It Treated?
Internationally recognized MS expert Patricia K. Coyle, MD, Founder and Director of Stony Brook's MS Comprehensive Care Center, explains what MS is, how it's managed and how Stony Brook can help.
print-icon Understanding Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in Children and Teens
Laura Krupp, MD, Program Director, National Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Center at Stony Brook, explains what MS is, how to manage the condition in children and teens, and the unique resources available at Stony Brook Children's Hospital.
print-icon What's the Difference Between Neurologic Lyme Disease and MS?
Hearing the words “you have Lyme disease” or “you have MS (multiple sclerosis)” can be quite unsettling. And to complicate matters, when Lyme disease affects the central nervous system, the symptoms can be very similar to MS. Dr. Olga Syritsyna is a neurologist with subspecialty training in neurologic Lyme disease and MS.

Neuropsychology

print-icon What Every Parent Should Know About Our Neuropsychology Services
Neuropsychology is an area of psychology that focuses on the relationships between the human brain, behavior and mind. Often, in the aftermath of a life-altering illness or brain injury, a referral to a neuropsychologist is critical in helping a child or adolescent improve their emotional wellbeing and helping to ensure that the right accommodations are in place for school, extracurricular activities, work and home.

New Treatments for Stroke

print-icon What You Should Know About Treatments for Ischemic Stroke
Ischemic strokes are the most common type of stroke, occurring in about 80 percent of cases. A major new recommendation from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association is for selected acute ischemic stroke patients to receive mechanical thrombectomy, a procedure to remove clots that block large vessels, as the standard of care.

Obesity

print icon image What You Should Know About Bariatric Surgery
Dr. Aurora Pryor shares what is involved in bariatric surgery, Stony Brook's approach and procedures offered.
print-icon What You Should Know About Diabetes and Obesity
Aurora Pryor, MD, talks about the relationship between diabetes and obesity.

Open MRIs

print-icon What You Need to Know About Open MRIs
Do you know the difference between a traditional MRI and an open MRI? When would you use one over the other? Does it matter? Stony Brook Medicine Radiologist Dr. Matthew Barish explains the differences as well as other key information about imaging testing.

Pain Management

print-icon Seeking Relief for Pain: A Variety of Options at Stony Brook
When pain – whether short term or chronic – begins to interfere with someone's daily functions or activities, getting proper treatment by a pain management specialist can be life changing. Dr. Marco Palmieri discusses the different types of pain that may benefit from specialized treatment, as well as some of the traditional and alternative treatment options available today.
print-icon A Breakthrough Therapy for Chronic Pain
Patients are finding new hope for relief of chronic, nerve-related pain with Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) therapy, a newer, FDA-approved treatment. Stony Brook Medicine pain expert Marco Palmieri, DO, trained in this therapy, explains how it works and who may benefit from it.

Palliative Care

print-icon What You Need to Know About Palliative Care
Lynn Hallarman, MD, Director, Palliative Care Medicine, explains what people should know concerning these important services.

Pediatric Arthritis

print-icon What Parents Should Know About Arthritis and Children
Although most people associate arthritis with aging, the fact is, one in 1,000 children is diagnosed with juvenile arthritis. As part of Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month, Pediatric Rheumatologist Dr. Julie Cherian addresses the most common questions from parents – and discusses what they can do if they suspect their child may have arthritis.

Pediatric Brain Tumors

print-icon What Parents Should Know About Brain Tumors in Children
After leukemia, brain tumors represent the most common type of cancers in children. In 2013, there were over 4,000 newly diagnosed pediatric brain tumors in the United States; over 3,000 occurred in children under the age of 15. Dr. Chesler, a fellowship-trained expert on childhood brain tumors, is one of fewer than 200 actively practicing pediatric neurosurgeons in the United States.

Pediatric Cleft Palate

print-icon Something to Smile About - A Premier Cleft Palate Team
You probably know someone born with a cleft lip or palate - it's among the most common types of birth defects. But did you know that one of the nation's premier cleft palate teams is as close as Stony Brook Children's Hospital? Here, plastic surgeon Dr. Alexander Dagum and orthodontist Dr. Leon Klempner talk about what kids with clefts need over the course of their childhood - and how Stony Brook helps them.

Pediatric Diabetes

print-icon What You Need to Know About Diabetes in Children
Diabetes is not just an adult disease. Diabetes can affect people of all ages, including infants and children. There are two primary forms: Type 1, which is an autoimmune disease, and Type 2, which is associated with increased body weight. Pediatric endocrinologists, Thomas A. Wilson, MD, and Jennifer Osipoff, MD, discuss diabetes in children and the treatments available at Stony Brook Children's Service.

Pediatric Ear, Nose and Throat

print-icon What Parents Need to Know About Tonsillectomy
Wasyl Szeremeta, MD, a pediatric otolaryngologist and Division Chief of Pediatric ENT at Stony Brook Children's Hospital, wants parents to be more aware of tonsillectomy, the third most common surgery in the U.S. for children. Here, he talks about when and why a child should have a tonsillectomy and why specialized pediatric expertise is so important.

Pediatric Emergency Care

print-icon Common Questions About Pediatric Emergency Care
Parents need to know what type of emergency care is available for their children if they become acutely ill or injured. Carl Kaplan, MD, Director of the Pediatric Emergency Department at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital, provides some important information about pediatric emergency care.

Pediatric Food Allergies

print-icon Questions About Food Allergies in Children
Today, more and more infants and children are being diagnosed with asthma, eczema, hay fever and food allergies. Food allergies are of particular concern, because reactions may be severe and even fatal. Currently, one in 13 children has a food allergy. Here, Dr. Susan Schuval talks about the rising incidence of food allergies in children, and what parents need to know.

Pediatric Heart Condition

print-icon When Your Child Has a Heart Condition… Here’s What Matters
When your child has a heart condition, expertise and state-of-the-art care count, but so do other factors, like compassion, communication and accessibility. Pediatric Cardiologist Laurie E. Panesar, MD, and Nurse Practitioner Marybeth Heyden, who holds a doctorate in nursing, talk about Stony Brook’s unique approach.
print-icon A Heartfelt Talk About Pediatric Cardiology
It can be frightening and confusing for parents to hear their child may have a heart problem. Fortunately, Long Island is home to one of New York’s most renowned academic medical centers and the only children’s hospital in Suffolk County. Pediatric cardiologists at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital answer your questions about childhood heart disease.

Pediatric Hypertension

print-icon Pediatric Hypertension: A Growing Problem with Long-Term Health Risks
People rarely think that children can have high blood pressure. But the reality is that hypertension is becoming a growing problem among children and teens. Dr. Robert Woroniecki, Division Chief of Pediatric Nephrology and Hypertension, and Dr. Katarina Supe-Markovina, Director of the new Pediatric Hypertension Center at Stony Brook Children's Hospital, discuss what every parent needs to know.

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)

print icon image Get to Know Stony Brook Children's Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)
Critical care medicine is a special discipline that brings together healthcare professionals to help seriously ill patients. Stony Brook Children’s pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) has a highly skilled healthcare team led by Margaret Parker, MD, who was recently named a Master of Critical Care Medicine by the Society of Critical Care Medicine.

Pediatric Nephrology

print-icon Kids and Kidneys: What Parents Should Know
What should you know about your child’s kidneys and when should you seek help? The pediatric nephrologists (children’s kidney specialists) at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital offer comprehensive services for kidney problems of all kinds — with an emphasis on accurate and early identification of potential issues. Dr. Robert Woroniecki, Division Chief of Pediatric Nephrology and Hypertension, and Dr. Katarina Supe-Markovina, Director of the new Pediatric Hypertension Center at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital, discuss what every parent needs to know.

Pediatric Neuropsychology

print icon image What Every Parent Should Know About Our Neuropsychology Services
Neuropsychology is an area of psychology that focuses on the relationships between the human brain, behavior and mind. Often, in the aftermath of a life-altering illness or brain injury, a referral to a neuropsychologist is critical in helping a child or adolescent improve their emotional wellbeing and helping to ensure that the right accommodations are in place for school, extracurricular activities, work and home.

Pediatric Obesity

print-icon What Parents Need to Know About Their Child’s Weight
Today, one in three children can be classified as overweight or obese, which puts them at risk for serious health problems. Rosa Cataldo, DO, MPH, Director of the Healthy Weight & Wellness Center at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital, discusses what parents can do now to keep their child at a healthy weight and get them on the road to a healthy life.

Pediatric Pulmonary and Cystic Fibrosis

print-icon Pediatric Pulmonology and Cystic Fibrosis
What could be more important than every breath your child takes? Stony Brook Children’s Hospital’s pediatric pulmonology services help Suffolk County children with everything from asthma and chronic lung diseases to cystic fibrosis and sleep disorders. Here, Division Chief Catherine Kier, MD, talks about new ways Stony Brook Children’s is helping the children (and their parents) breathe easier.

Pediatric Surgery

print-icon When Kids Need Surgery
Pediatric surgery is a unique medical specialty, provided by highly skilled general surgeons further trained in the intricacies of treating smaller patients, including those not yet born. Christopher S. Muratore, MD, Chief of the Division of Pediatric Surgery, discusses the reasons why parents should seek out a pediatric surgeon should their child require a surgical procedure.

Pediatric Weight & Wellness

print-icon What Parents Need to Know About Their Child’s Weight
Today, one in three children can be classified as overweight or obese, which puts them at risk for serious health problems. Rosa Cataldo, DO, MPH, Director of the Healthy Weight & Wellness Center at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital, discusses what parents can do now to keep their child at a healthy weight and get them on the road to a healthy life.

Peripheral Nerve Disorders

print-icon Why do I have a constant prickly-tingly feeling in my arm?
Courtney Pendleton, MD, a neurosurgeon who is fellowship trained in peripheral nerve disorders, explains what peripheral nerves are, problems that can arise with them and how they can be treated.

Pituitary Tumors

print-icon What You Should Know About Pituitary Tumors
A pituitary tumor is an abnormal growth of cells in the pituitary gland, which is a small, pea-sized organ located in the center of the brain, behind the nose and eyes. Endocrinologist, Igor Kravets, MD and Neurosurgeon, Raphael Davis, MD, discuss the different types of pituitary tumors, the symptoms and various treatments available at Stony Brook Medicine's Pituitary Care Center.

Pregnancy and Prematurity

print-icon What You Should Know About Premature Birth
Shanthy Sridhar, MD, Chief, NICU Medical Director, Fellowship Director discusses prematurity and neonatal and perinatal care.
print-icon Leading the Fight Against Premature Births
In the United States, one in eight babies is born too soon, translating into more than a half million premature births a year. Not only is prematurity the number-one cause of newborn death, but it also puts surviving infants at risk for severe health problems and lifelong disabilities. Drs. J. Gerald Quirk and Shanthy Sridhar discuss the depth of resources Stony Brook offers the community — and why those at risk for premature birth are referred or transferred to Stony Brook.

Pulmonology

print icon image Diagnosing and Treating Lung Cancer with Interventional Pulmonology
Advanced diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are performed by interventional pulmonologists. Stephen Kuperberg, MD, Interventional Pulmonologist on the Lung Cancer Team at Stony Brook University Cancer Center, explains how cutting-edge advances in interventional pulmonology are taking lung and airway cancer diagnosis and treatment to the next level.

Safety and Nutrition for Young Athletes

print-icon What You Should Know About Preventing Children's Sports Injuries
James Penna, MD, Assistant Professor, Orthopaedics, answers questions on this topic.

Skin Cancer

print-icon It's Good for Your Health to Know about the Dark Side of the Sun
Skin cancer — including melanoma and basal and squamous cell carcinomas — is the most common of all cancer types. The rates of melanoma have been rising for the last 30 years. Tara L. Huston, MD, assistant professor of surgery and dermatology, and leader of Stony Brook's Melanoma Management Team, explains what can be done to help prevent skin cancer and how to detect its early signs.

Skin Cancer Prevention: Sun Safety

print-icon Summer Sun Safety: What You Absolutely Need to Know Now
Maribeth Chitkara, MD, a pediatric hospitalist with Stony Brook Children's Hospital, discusses summer safety and skin cancer prevention steps you can take today to keep yourself, your family and your children safe all summer long.

Skull Base Tumors

print-icon Skull Base Tumors: What They Are and What to Do About Them
As neurosurgeon Raphael P. Davis, MD, explains, a skull base tumor can be life-threatening, but there are new options for treatment.

Sinus

print-icon What You Need to Know About Sinusitis and Sinus Surgery
When a patient is diagnosed with chronic sinusitis that has not responded to medication, surgery may provide needed relief. Ghassan J. Samara, MD, a leader on the rhinology team of the Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Division at Stony Brook Medicine, discusses the problems of sinusitis and the minimally invasive surgical treatments for it, including the novel Propel® stent, available at Stony Brook.

Sinus Surgery

print-icon What You Need to Know About Sinusitis and Sinus Surgery
When a patient is diagnosed with chronic sinusitis that has not responded to medication, surgery may provide needed relief. Ghassan J. Samara, MD, a leader on the rhinology team of the Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Division at Stony Brook Medicine, discusses the problems of sinusitis and the minimally invasive surgical treatments for it, including the novel Propel® stent, available at Stony Brook.

Sleep Disorders

print icon image What You Need to Know About Sleep Disorders
Avram R. Gold, MD, Medical Director of the Sleep Disorders Center, provides information about sleep disorders and how to get a better night's sleep.
print-icon Sleep Disorders in Children
According to the National Sleep Foundation, about 69 percent of children age 10 and under experience some type of sleep problem, and of these, about half might need medical attention. Catherine Kier, MD, a pediatric pulmonologist and pediatric sleep specialist, discusses sleep disorders in infants and children, and what measures you can take to promote better sleep.

Stroke

print icon image What You Need to Know About Stroke
Would you be able to recognize the signs and symptoms of stroke? Do you know what to do if you suspect that you or a family member is having a stroke? We spoke with neurologist Michael Guido, MD, who is the director of the Stony Brook Neurology Stroke Program and David Fiorella, MD, PhD, who is the director of the Stony Brook Cerebrovascular Center.
print icon image

What You Should Know About Treatments for Ischemic Stroke
A major new recommendation from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) is for selected acute ischemic stroke patients to receive mechanical thrombectomy, a procedure to remove clots that block large vessels, as the standard of care.

print icon image
Why Having 24/7 Access to Advanced Stroke Care Matters
Recently, Stony Brook University Hospital became the first hospital in Suffolk County to achieve advanced, Comprehensive Stroke Center certification by The Joint Commission, the nation’s largest standards-setting and accrediting body in health care. Dr. Michael Guido and Dr. David Fiorella, co-directors of the Stony Brook University Cerebrovascular and Comprehensive Stroke Center explain why having a certified Comprehensive Stroke Center in your community matters.
print icon image Why Having a Mobile Stroke Unit Program in the Community Matters
Stony Brook Medicine recently rolled out Long Island’s first Mobile Stroke Unit program. Mobile stroke units have successfully reduced stroke disability and improved survival rates in other major metropolitan areas across the country.

Suicide Prevention

print icon image Are suicidal thoughts common?
Suicide refers to a death caused by someone injuring themselves with the intent to die. And it’s occurring at an alarming rate in the U.S. Among Americans aged 10 to 24 and aged 25 to 44, suicide is the second leading cause of death. Now with social distancing, quarantine and isolation, there’s even more concern.

Sun Safety

print-icon Summer Sun Safety: What You Absolutely Need to Know Now
Maribeth Chitkara, MD, a pediatric hospitalist with Stony Brook Children's Hospital, discusses summer safety and skin cancer prevention steps you can take today to keep yourself, your family and your children safe all summer long.

Tonsillectomy

print-icon What Parents Need to Know About Tonsillectomy
Wasyl Szeremeta, MD, a pediatric otolaryngologist and Division Chief of Pediatric ENT at Stony Brook Children's Hospital, wants parents to be more aware of tonsillectomy, the third most common surgery in the U.S. for children. Here, he talks about when and why a child should have a tonsillectomy and why specialized pediatric expertise is so important.

Trauma

print-icon If Trauma Happens: What Should You Do and Where Should You Go?
Traumas come in many forms: automobile accidents, burns, falls, serious injury and other unplanned events. What they all have in common, however, is that they need immediate, expert treatment. How do you know where to go? Trauma surgeon Dr. James Vosswinkel shares his perspective on how to make such a critical decision.

Trigeminal Neuralgia

print icon image What You Should Know About Trigeminal Neuralgia
Trigeminal neuralgia, or tic douloureux, is a devastating facial pain syndrome from which millions of Americans suffer. However, as Chuck Mikell, MD, a neurosurgeon who is an expert in treating this syndrome explains, with proper diagnosis, treatment is available, and there is no reason to live with the pain of trigeminal neuralgia.

Vascular Disease

print icon image Preventing Strokes for People with Carotid Artery Disease
Patients with advanced carotid artery disease have an increased risk of having a stroke that may significantly decrease their quality of life. To help reduce the incidence of stroke, vascular surgeons at Stony Brook Vascular Center are using an advanced procedure called transcarotid artery revascularization — TCAR. This is a safe, minimally invasive procedure that can give patients a future without strokes. Angela Kokkosis, MD, a vascular surgeon, explains.
print icon image What You Should Know About Vascular Disease
Apostolos Tassiopoulos, MD, Chief, Division of Vascular Surgery, talks about three major vascular conditions that can jeopardize your health, and why it’s best to identify and treat underlying causes before symptoms appear.

Vehicular Safety – Child and Teen

print icon image What Parents Need to Know about Child and Teen Car Safety
The facts couldn’t be clearer: Car accidents are the number-one cause of accidental deaths in children ages 0-19 nationally. And in New York State, Suffolk County has the highest teen death rate from auto accidents. Motor vehicle accidents are also responsible for an alarming proportion of disabling injuries. The experts at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital want you to not only be aware of this problem, but also to take action to keep your children and teens safe.

Voice

print icon image Listen to What Your Voice Is Telling You
Your voice is invaluable — to basic communication, to your occupation, to self-expression, to your identity. You can help keep this vital gift in good health by treating your voice kindly and staying alert to changes that may signal a problem. Here are suggestions from voice specialists Melissa M. Mortensen, MD, Elliot Regenbogen, MD, and Marilyn D. Baricevac, MS, CCC-SLP.

Water Safety

print-icon Summer Water Safety: What You Absolutely Need to Know
With Long Island's miles of beaches and acres of pools, Maribeth Chitkara, MD, a pediatric hospitalist with Stony Brook Children's Hospital, gives tips on water safety. Dr. Chitkara is one of Long Island's most committed advocates for summer safety, and shares steps you can take to keep yourself, your family and your children safe all summer long.
print icon image Summer Safety: How to Prevent Pool Drownings
Right now families are spending even more time together at home. With summer here, that can mean lots of pool time and, sadly, preventable drownings. Kristi Ladowski, our injury prevention specialist, offers sound advice that can help keep your family safe.

For more information, call HealthConnect® at (631) 444-4000.

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All health and health-related information contained in this article is intended to be general and/or educational in nature and should not be used as a substitute for a visit with a healthcare professional for help, diagnosis, guidance, and treatment. The information is intended to offer only general information for individuals to discuss with their healthcare provider. It is not intended to constitute a medical diagnosis or treatment or endorsement of any particular test, treatment, procedure, service, etc. Reliance on information provided is at the user's risk. Your healthcare provider should be consulted regarding matters concerning the medical condition, treatment, and needs of you and your family. Stony Brook University/SUNY is an affirmative action, equal opportunity educator and employer.