Women's Vascular Health — Oftentimes Overlooked

Angela A. Kokkosis, MD | Stony Brook Vascular Surgeon
Dr. Angela A. Kokkosis
Much awareness has been raised about the risks of vascular disease in men, but not as much for women. Women over the age of 60 are at increased risk of developing abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and carotid arterial disease.

By age 70, this risk is the same as it is for men. As with heart disease, women with certain vascular conditions may have different signs and symptoms than men, which can result in delays in diagnosis and potentially worse outcomes.

"Women need be aware of their own risk factors, signs, and symptoms, so they can be proactive in the prevention and treatment of vascular disease."

As a national leader in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of vascular disease, Stony Brook Vascular Center has established programs aimed at improving women's vascular health.

Angela A. Kokkosis, MD, assistant professor of surgery, and associate program director of the phlebology fellowship at Stony Brook's Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, leads these efforts.

"Vascular disease is another aspect in women's health that is not completely understood, resulting in misdiagnosis and underdiagnosis," says Dr. Kokkosis. "It is vital for women to be aware of their own risk factors, signs, and symptoms, so they can be proactive in the prevention and treatment of vascular disease."

To learn more about our programs in women's vascular health, please call Olympia Christoforatos, RN, Stony Brook Vascular Center, at 631-444-2041.