Facts About the Flu Among Topics at SBUMC's Mini-Med School

 

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    DISTINGUISH FACT FROM FEAR WHEN IT COMES TO THE FLU

    LEARN WHY FALLS CAN BE FATAL TO ELDERY

    SBUMC’s Mini-Med School Educates Public, Starts October 8

    STONY BROOK, N.Y., August 25, 2008 – From the facts about influenza to the science of acupuncture and health conditions that predispose elderly to falls, the 2009 Stony Brook University School of Medicine Mini-Med School will appeal to a wide audience. The six-week education series gives attendees a chance to be “med students” and learn in detail about a host of biomedical science topics. The Mini-Med School begins October 8 and runs to November 12.

    The Mini-Med School will be held Thursday evenings from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm in the Health Sciences Center (HSC). The program is designed to expose participants to topics in medical science, patient care, and cutting-edge research at SBUMC. Professionals within the healthcare arena will present engaging lectures and intriguing demonstrations during each of the sessions.

     “Our presenters this year include some of the top physicians and researchers in fields such as Infectious Diseases, Geriatrics, and Anesthesiology,” says Peter C. Williams, J.D., Ph.D., Vice Dean, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, and Course Director. “Though their eyes, participants will come to understand much more about important medical topics relevant to our current society.”

    Featured speakers and topics include: “Influenza: An Important Health Issue, Distinguishing Fact from Fear,” a discussion about prevention and therapy and a history of epidemics, by Roy Steigbigel, M.D., Professor of Medicine and a nationally recognized infectious diseases expert; “How do Patients and Providers Make ‘Informed’ Decisions?” a presentation of the myriad of health information that is available, by Jolyon Jesty, Ph.D., Professor of Medicine; “Falls in the Elderly,” a lecture on why falls are the fifth leading cause of death in the elderly, by Catherine Nicastri, M.D., Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine; and “The Science of Medical Acupuncture,” a presentation that reviews the current science behind acupuncture, by Carole W. Agin, M.D., M.P.A., Clinical Associate professor of Anesthesiology.

    The program will be limited to 200 registrants. All who attend at least five of the six lectures will receive certificates of achievement at the conclusion of the series on November 12. Classes are held in Lecture Hall 1, HSC, Level 2.

    Tuition is $25 per person for the entire series. The cost covers course materials, parking and beverages. The series is supported in part by The Times Beacon Record Newspapers.

    Registration is required by September 14. To receive an application, please visit the Mini-Med School website at /minimed or call (631) 444-3423. Checks should be made payable to SBF Account 900317. Completed registration forms and tuition should be mailed to School of Medicine, Mini-Med School, Health Sciences Center, Level 4-176, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8430.


    Mini-Med School Series Schedule
    Stony Brook University School of Medicine

    Thursday, October 8, 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
    •    “Welcome and Introduction to Academic Medicine,” Peter C. Williams, J.D., Ph.D., Vice Dean & Course Director.
    •    “Influenza: An Important Health Issue, Distinguishing Fact from Fear,” Roy Steigbigel, M.D., Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases.
     
    Thursday, October 15, 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
    •    “How do Patients and Providers Make “Informed” Decisions?” Jolyon Jesty, Ph.D., Professor of Medicine, Division of Hematology.
    •    Optional Activity (5:30 pm to 6:45 pm): Visit the Consumer Health Information Table via help from HSC Informatics librarians.

    Thursday, October 22, 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
    •    “Falls in the Elderly,” Catherine Nicastri, M.D., Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatrics.

    Thursday, October 29, 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
    •    “The Science of Medical Acupuncture,” Carole W. Agin, M.D., M.P., Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Anesthesiology.
     
    Thursday, November 5, 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
    •    “Heartburn & Ulcers, the Colon and the Pancreas,” Jonathan Buscalgia, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology.

    Thursday, November 12, 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
    •    “The Impact of Compassionate Care Clinical Outcomes,” Stephen G. Post, Ph.D., Professor of Preventive Medicine, and Maria A. Basile, M.D., Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine, Center for Medical Humanities, Compassionate Care and Bioethics.

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